Former Lectures 2015 - 2019

Winter Term 2019/2020

Future Challenges and Trends in HCI

Directed Studies, 4ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

In the human-computer interaction domain there is an atmosphere of optimism! Some also speak of the beginning of the "third wave of HCI", which integrates human-computer interaction into completely new areas of our daily lives - away from the pure optimization of the workplace. In this seminar, students are given the opportunity to gain an insight into the future of HCI through selected topics (e.g. brain-computer interfaces, mixed reality, physical computing, immersive analytics, AI and HCI, conversational interfaces). For this purpose, a selection of basic literature will be made available, which will be prepared and expanded by further sources in the context of the topic. Finally, the results will be presented and summarized in a term paper. The topics cover completely different areas, for example how the desktop of the future could look like, how to determine whether an interactive product is not only user-friendly, but also fun, or how new input devices can be integrated into daily life. 

Goals

The basic learning objective is to scientifically develop, prepare and present (both verbally and in writing) a current research area of HCI. In addition to familiarising students with the basic literature, scientific research is another focus here in order to illuminate the subject area as comprehensively as possible.

Prerequisites

Participants must have successfully completed the courses "Interactive Systems" or "UX Design" or similar HCI-related courses form other universities.

Assessments

  • 45 min seminar presentation in the course. It includes 15 min discussion.
  • The participation in the all meeting is mandatory. All topics will be introduced and the schedule will be announced.
  • 8 pages term paper in ACM format

Research Methods in HCI

Lecture, 6ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

Evaluation serves the purpose to recognize usability problems early in the development phase of interactive products and develop ideas for improvement. There is a broad spectrum of techniques and methods available (e.g. observation, usability tests, surveys, etc.), which differ in many terms, such as when to apply during the development process or whether to include end-users or experts and thereby provide results for different purposes.

During the theoretical part of the lecture, students will learn about the different basic methods and techniques. This includes the design and conduction of interviews, focus groups, usability tests, and inspection methods.

Another goal of the lecture is to guide students in conducting experimental user studies as advanced research methods. The lecture covers the whys and hows of conducting good experiments in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) covering both quantitative and qualitative practices. Students will learn how to build on existing work in formulating their research questions and devising hypotheses. In addition, the lecture addresses how to perform the data collection and select analysis methods that provide evidence for conclusions. Also, students learn how to narrate findings and deal with alternative explanations for results.

During the practical part of the lecture, students will work on a small project in groups. They will have to conduct a study and apply the learned methods to evaluate an interactive product. This allows them to gain first hands-on experiences and also use our usability lab.

Goals

At the end of this lecture, students will know
...basic evaluation methods and techniques of interactive products with regards to usability and user experience
...how to deduce change requirements and re-design recommendations
...how to develop and define research questions and hypotheses in HCI 
...the crucial components of successful study designs
...how to run experiments
...the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative and quantitative data acquisition
...how to analyze quantitative and qualitative data
...pitfalls and tips for successful report writing

Prerequisites

No official coursework is required as a prerequisite, but students should have substantial experience with computers, especially their interactive use, and an intense interest in making them easier to use. We recommend students to be familiar with the contents of the course “Interactive Systems”.

Assessments

Written exam, In-class exercises, and team project.

Bachelor-Project HCI

Project, 9ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

The student will be with working on a complex topic in the domain of Human-Computer Interaction, in most cases related to current research in the HCI group of Prof. Reiterer. They will start with elaborating a theoretical perspective on the topic, e.g. through intensive literature research (in combination with the project seminar). The second part of the project will focus on implementation and evaluation of prototypes.

In this weekly get-together, students are invited to present the current status of their seminar or project work. Informal discussions with all attendees will help to find thematic overlaps, possible technical solutions, and targeted guidance that help to proceed to the next step (e.g., from seminar to project). All students are asked to attend regularly and present their current status in a small presentation (ca. 10 min) three times per semester.

Goals

Scientific work (independent and in teamwork). The students will learn how to organize (Milestones, Meetings), conduct (implementation, evaluation, documentation) and communicate (presentation, thesis) an ambitious project.

Prerequisites

Basic skills in the field of human-computer interaction as taught in the principal lecture of human-computer interaction. Parallel to the Thesis' Project students have to participate in the Thesis's Seminar in their fifth semester. During their sixth semester students have to participate in the two lectures Usability Engineering 1 and 2 and the Seminar about selective topics from human-computer interaction.

Assessments

  1. Technical report about the practical work (15-20 pages)
  2. 30 min presentation about the project

Master-Project HCI

Project, 9ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

The project builds on the master's seminar. It prepares for writing the master's thesis and requires participants to solve a complex topic of human-computer interaction. Two models exist: 

  • The design-oriented project covers the conceptual design and the implementation of a novel interaction concept. The concepts (e.g., scenarios, personas, sketches, storyboards) and their implementation are documented in the written project report. 
  • The evaluation-oriented project consists of the conduction of a comprehensive evaluation study. The subject matter of the evaluation, the chosen evaluation setting, and the conduction (including a pilot study) are documented in the written project report.

The participants present the intermediate results of their work in class. Active participation in the discussion of the presented work is expected.

Goals

Under guidance, the participants learn how to organize a challenging project (division, milestones, meetings), carry it out (implementation, evaluation, documentation) and communicate (presentations, scientific thesis).

Prerequisites

In addition to basic knowledge of interactive systems (lecture: "Interactive Systems"), design (lecture: "Agile UX"), and research methods (lecture: "Research Methods in HCI"), advanced knowledge in the field of human-computer interaction is expected. This knowledge is taught for example in the lectures "Interactions in Mixed Reality Spaces" and "Future Challenges and Trends in HCI".

The successful completion of all lectures of the compulsory area and the master's seminar is required.

Please note: In order to do your master's seminar, master's project and master's thesis at the Chair of Human-Computer Interaction, you have to discuss the selection of in-depth courses and courses from other departments as part of a mentoring talk with Professor Reiterer, in advance.

Assessments

  1. Project report: ca. 30-60 pages in the Springer Format (or similar) 
  2. Project talk: 30 minutes + subsequent discussion

Seminar for the Bachelor's Project in HCI

Seminar, 4ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

At the beginning of the class topics will be contracted out to participants. Topics will be with close regards to content and task to the individually selected bachelor-project in human-computer interaction (see related class description). Due to this students will perform theoretical preparatory work to the bachelor-project. The seminar for the bachelor-project is to be simultaneously accomplished during the 1st part of the bachelor-project.

In this weekly get-together, students are invited to present the current status of their seminar or project work. Informal discussions with all attendees will help to find thematic overlaps, possible technical solutions, and targeted guidance that help to proceed to the next step (e.g., from seminar to project). All students are asked to attend regularly and present their current status in a small presentation (ca. 10 min) three times per semester.

Goals

Independent scientific work practice as preparation to the bachelor-project and the bachelor thesis. At the end, the students will be capable of developing a topic, present it intelligibly, and write it down adequately. This includes the thorough use of literature, presentation skills, use of presentation media and scientific writing skills. Thereby, students will be well prepared both methodologically and subject-specific to write the bachelors thesis.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction, e.g. by having attended the lecture “Human-Computer Interaction” or “Computer Graphics and Interactive Systems”.

Assessments

  1. A term paper 10 pages (ACM Format)
  2. 45 min presentation

Seminar for the Master's Project in HCI

Seminar, 4ECTS

Details in ZEUS

Course Description

At the beginning of the class topics will be contracted out to participants. Topics will be with close regards to content and task to the individually selected master-project in human-computer interaction (see related class description). Due to this students will perform theoretical preparatory work to the master-project. The seminar for the master-project is to be simultaneously accomplished during the 1st part of the master-project.

In this weekly get-together, students are invited to present the current status of their seminar or project work. Informal discussions with all attendees will help to find thematic overlaps, possible technical solutions, and targeted guidance that help to proceed to the next step (e.g., from seminar to project). All students are asked to attend regularly and present their current status in a small presentation (ca. 10 min) three times per semester.

Goals

Autonomous scientific working as a preparation for the master-project and -thesis. Students should become capable of compiling, comprehensibly presenting, and appropriatly writing down a topic. This especially includes handling literature thoroughly, presenting techniques, making use of various presentation tools, and scientific writing. This is to ensure that students learn the essential technical and methodical requirements to write a master-thesis already during their seminar for the master-project.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction, e.g. by having attended the lecture “Interactive Systems” or similar lectures in your BA program.

Assessments

  1. A term paper 10 pages (ACM Format)
  2. 45 min presentation (30 min presentation plus 15 min discussion)

Summer Term 2019

Winter Term 2018/2019

Master's Project Human-Computer Interaction

Dozent

Harald Reiterer

Link

Details in ZEUS

Contents

Each student will be assigned to an individual project, which will be related to current research projects of the Human-Computer Interaction group (see website hci.uni-konstanz.de) or on cooperations with industrial partners.


Learning objectives

Students will learn how to organize (partitioning, milestones, meetings), execute (implementation, evaluation, documentation), and communicate (presentation, scientific thesis) a challenging project. Another important topic is to learn Scientific work style. 


Prerequisites

Advanced knowledge of the Human-Computer Interaction domain, ideally by having attended specific lectures and seminars. Students are advised to attend lectures provided by Prof. Reiterer’s group in parallel to the project (will be defined during the Mentor Conversation). This allows students to gain additional theoretical and practical knowledge, in relationship to the master project topic.


Remark

This lecture won’t have a regular weekly schedule. Instead, supervision will be on an individual level by the advisors (Prof. Reiterer & his research staff).

ECTS

9


Record of academic assessments

  • Technical report about the practical work (15-20 pages)
  • 30 min presentation of the main project results (including demo) plus 15 min discussion

Course literature

The literature depends on the specific topic of the project and will be negotiated with the advisor.


Workload

A total of 300 hours divided into

  • 56 hours study with compulsory attendance
  • 244 hours self-study

Media Exhibition Design - Artificial Intelligence

Dozenten:

  • Prof. Eberhard W. Schlag, HTWG Konstanz, Architektur und Design
  • Dr. Jan Behnstedt-Renn - Universität Konstanz, Lecturer Medien & Geschichte
  • Prof. Dr. Falk Schreiber - Universität Konstanz, Life Science Informatics
  • Dr. Björn Sommer - Universität Konstanz, Life Science Informatics
  • Daniel Klinkhammer - Universität Konstanz, Human-Computer Interaction Group

Link

Details in ZEUS

Beschreibung

Die interdisziplinäre Lehrveranstaltung ist Teil des Studienmoduls „Historische Vermittlungskompetenz“ und bündelt die an beiden Hochschulen (HTWG Konstanz & Universität Konstanz) vorhandenen Kompetenzen von Historikern, Medientechnikern und -gestaltern, Informatikern, Architekten und Kommunikationsdesignern in einzigartiger Weise. Studierende der verschiedenen Fachbereiche erhalten die Gelegenheit, gemeinsam in interdisziplinären Gruppen an anspruchsvollen Projekten zusammen zu arbeiten und technisch und gestalterisch neue Ansätze zu entwickeln.

Innerhalb der vergangen Semester wurden bereits zwei Ausstellungen realisiert, welche im Bildungsturm der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich waren. Tell Genderes & Rebuild Palmyra

Weiterhin ist die Lehrveranstaltung Teil des Forschungsprojektes Blended Museum Blended Museum.

Das Thema der nächsten Ausstellung lautet:

Künstliche Intelligenz. Geschichte, Gegenwart und Zukunft einer Verheißung

Das Thema der Künstlichen Intelligenz als Schlüsseltechnologie der Zukunft hat Konjunktur. Mit der Ankündigung aus dem Bundeskanzleramt, die Forschung und Entwicklung intelligenter Systeme in Deutschland zukünftig in der nationalen Strategie eine KI-Ökosystems aus Forschung, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft zu bündeln, um im Wettbewerb mit den Vereinigten Staaten und China bestehen zu können, ist auch die geopolitische Dimension der KI noch einmal ins Bewusstsein einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit gerückt worden. Mit der zunehmenden Durchdringungstiefe von smart devices ist die vernetzte Welt intelligenter Systeme im Alltag ohnehin längst angekommen. In welchem Maße KI polarisiert zeigt sich nicht nur in den Big Data-Debatten um informationelle Selbstbestimmung, auch der radikale Strukturwandel der Arbeitswelt nährt Hoffnungen wie Befürchtungen gleichermaßen. Stellen lernfähige, adaptive Algorithmen in neuronalen Netzen tatsächlich eine Welt in Aussicht, die effizienter, flexibler, profitabler und sicherer ist oder treiben sie die Entstehung einer Kontrollgesellschaft voran, aus der es kein Entrinnen mehr geben wird?

Die positiven wie negativen Potentiale der KI werden seit ihrer Entstehung von utopischen und apokalyptischen Szenarien begleitet. Diese visionären Entwürfe sind ein fester Bestandteil unserer Medien- und Populärkultur. Auch wenn sie auf ältere, historisch überlieferte Wissensbestände zurückgreifen, entwerfen sie eine mehr oder weniger nahe Zukunft, die die Frage aufwirft, welchen Platz der Mensch noch in einer Welt einnimmt, in der die Unterscheidung zwischen Mensch und Maschine hinfällig wird oder sich die technische Schöpfung gegenüber seinem Schöpfer zu verselbständigen droht.

Im kommenden Semestern soll eine Ausstellung konzipiert werden, die sich mit den Chancen und Risiken künstlicher Intelligenz auseinandersetzt. Dabei steht nicht nur die Darstellung gegenwärtiger und zukünftiger Anwendungsfelder im Zentrum, sondern auch die Geschichte der strukturellen Transformation der Industriegesellschaft zur Informationsgesellschaft seit der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Die Ausstellung versteht sich damit zugleich als ein Beitrag zu der gesellschaftlich virulenten Frage, wie der unvermeidlich voranschreitende Prozess der Digitalisierung unserer Lebenswelt gestaltet werden soll.

Im kommenden Wintersemester soll die Ausstellung konzipiert und im darauffolgenden Sommersemester dann realisiert werden.

Lernziele

Die Lehrveranstaltungen des Fachs »Historische Vermittlungskompetenz« bauen aufeinander auf, können aber auch einzeln besucht werden. Im WS 2018/19 erfolgt die Fortsetzung der Veranstaltung durch die Gestaltung eines realen Ausstellungsprojektes einschließlich Entwicklung der Medientechnik und Produktion im Rahmen des Masterprojekts Design und Raum.

Empfohlene Voraussetzung

Formale Voraussetzungen für die Teilnahme gibt es keine.

Eine Teilnahme an der Grundveranstaltung „Mediale Ausstellungsgestaltung. Interaktive Medien im Kontext von Raum, Licht, Ton und Grafik.“, welche im Sommersemester 2018 stattfand ist von Vorteil.

ECTS

9

Leistungsnachweis

Gruppenarbeit, Gruppenpräsentationen, Erstellung von interaktiven Konzepten zur medialen Informationspräsentation.

Seminar for the Bachelor's Project Human-Computer Interaction

Dozent

Harald Reiterer

Link

Details in ZEUS

Learning objectives

Independent scientific work practice as preparation to the bachelor-project and the bachelor thesis. At the end, the students will be capable of developing a topic, present it intelligibly, and write it down adequately. This includes the thorough use of literature, presentation skills, use of presentation media and scientific writing skills. Thereby, students will be well prepared both methodologically and subject-specific to write the bachelors thesis.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction, e.g. by having attended the lecture “Human-Computer Interaction” or “Computer Graphics and Interactive Systems”.

Contents

At the beginning of the class topics will be contracted out to participants. Topics will be with close regards to content and task to the individually selected bachelor-project in human-computer interaction (see related class description). Due to this students will perform theoretical preparatory work to the bachelor-project. The seminar for the bachelor-project is to be simultaneously accomplished during the 1st part of the bachelor-project. Topics will be presented approximatly in the middle of the semester as part of a colloquium that is visited by participants of the bachelor-project. Participants will be required to present their working progress regularly. The seminar will be accompanied by the groupware-system BSCW, that is, documents will be saved in the BSCW, personal supervision will be augmented by groupware-technologies, and electronical communication between all participants should be initiated.

Remark

Classes do not take place each week. Rather, participants are supervised on an individual basis through dedicated lecturers. At the end of the project one will have to present his findings to an audience.

ECTS

4

Record of academic assessments

  • A term paper 10 pages (ACM Format)
  • 45 min presentation

Course literature

Depends on the specific topic and will be coordinated with the supervisor.

Workload

A total of 120 hours divided into

  • 28 hours study with compulsory attendance
  • 92 hours self-study

Seminar for the Master's Project Human-Computer Interaction

Dozent

Harald Reiterer

Link

Details in ZEUS

Learning objectives

Autonomous scientific working as a preparation for the master-project and -thesis. Students should become capable of compiling, comprehensibly presenting, and appropriatly writing down a topic. This especially includes handling literature thoroughly, presenting techniques, making use of various presentation tools, and scientific writing. This is to ensure that students learn the essential technical and methodical requirements to write a master-thesis already during their seminar for the master-project.


Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction, e.g. by having attended the lecture “Interactive Systems” or similar lectures in your BA program.

Contents

At the beginning of the class topics will be contracted out to participants. Topics will be with close regards to content and task to the individually selected master-project in human-computer interaction (see related class description). Due to this students will perform theoretical preparatory work to the master-project. The seminar for the master-project is to be simultaneously accomplished during the 1st part of the master-project. Topics will be presented approximatly in the middle of the semester as part of a colloquium that is visited by participants of the seminar and master-projects. Participants will be required to present their working progress regularly. 


Remark


Classes do not take place each week. Rather, participants are supervised on an individual basis through dedicated lecturers. At the end of the seminar one will have to present his/her findings to all members of the HCI Lab (Prof. Reiterer & Post-Doc & PhDs & Student Researchers).


ECTS

4

Record of academic assessments

  • A term paper 10 pages (ACM Format)
  • 45 min presentation (30 min presentation plus 15 min discussion)

Course literature

Depends on the specific topic and will be coordinated with the supervisor.

Workload

A total of 120 hours divided into

  • 28 hours study with compulsory attendance
  • 92 hours self-study

Summer Term 2018

Winter Term 2017/2018

Summer Term 2017

Winter Term 2016/2017

Summer Term 2016

Winter Term 2015/2016

Summer Term 2015